Oeps !

April 6, 2018

I have been very busy during the past year and this was the reason for the few updates of this blog and my website.

Sorry about that.

But the result was worth it. During Easter I cleared the workshop and moved the boat ……………………….

More about that later ๐Ÿ™‚ ๐Ÿ™‚ ๐Ÿ™‚

20180330_233052_450

Advertisements

Cabin windows finished !

April 6, 2018

The design calls for screwed down windows, but I don’t like that solution. Instead I want to glue them in a rabbet. The outside of the window is then about flush with the outside of the hull. Determining the size of the intended windows, also a little different from plans, was a challenge to get it right. Finally I found out that I get the best appearance when the length halfway the height of the window is about the same for all three windows. The glazing material is smoke grey acrylic. The windows are curved in two directions and I prefer to make them pre-curved instead of pressing them in the right curve. So, first thing is to make a mold with the right curve in it. I did this by infusing a sandwich panel against the outside of the cabin wall. I outsourced the windows to a local specialized company,ย  de bootruitenspecialist. They used my molds to make the acrylic in the right shape. The result is fabulous and the windows fit perfectly.

20180314_180128_450

The acrylic has a black primer edge for UV protection and a sleek appearance.

20180317_143802_450

The assembly is done with VHB tape and the pane is pushed into the correct position with the help of a few temporary guide blocks.

20180317_150700_450

Work in progress !

20180318_135936_450

Vacuum bag to provide the right pressure along all edges.

20180325_104119_450

The edges sealed with a Bostic sealant.

20180325_104215_450

I am very happy with the result.

For more images see the cabin window photo gallery.


Three hulls coming together.

February 14, 2018

Three hulls coming together in three exciting moments.

The first one, aligning the lower folding struts with each other and in square relation to the mainhull. The distance difference between the for and aft lower folding strut at the inner end and the outer end is 6mm. on Starboard and 2mm. on Port. This means that the alignement of the carbon folding anchors in the mainhull is quite good. A great achievement and kind of reassuring for the next steps.

20171202_175552_450

The second one, first trial of the folding system. It works great !

FoldingAnimation

The third one, the final assembly of my trimaran. The transformation of three hulls and four beams into a boat is the climax of the construction. Finally everything comes together and leads to the trimaran I dreamed of. It is definitely a highlight of the construction so far. Although seeing her full beam for the first time is a bit intimidating …

20180127_150504_450

You can find much more photos in this gallery.

And this and this video on my youtube channel


More painting

February 12, 2018

See the latest update of the Fairing and Painting Photo Gallery.

20171126_162402_450

20171126_161450_450

20171125_145324_450

 


Floats down to Earth.

October 21, 2017

Dsc01496_450_aged

It’s been a long time since we hung the first float under the roof, followed by the second one. All those years they have collected only dust but now they can come down again.

20171017_172042_450

Something has changed.

20171008_111355_450

The port float is hanging above and behind the boat. To bring down the port float I first had to make room next to the boat. The boat has to slide sideways to create ample maneuver space for the forklift. With the help of two pallet jacks the boat easily slides sideways.

20171008_132909_45020171008_135436_450

With a makeshift boat-stand clamped to the forklift I carefully lifted the float, unscrewed the tensioning straps the floats were hanging in and bring it down. However, maneuvering with forklift and boat only takes one way. The port float is still looking in the wrong direction but turning is not possible because of lacking space. The workshop crane brings the solution.

20171008_145810_45020171008_150408_450

In the free space somewhere in the middle of the workshop height, I can turn the boat in the right direction and bring it back to the position at the port side of the center hull.

20171014_104800_45020171014_123413_45020171014_131026_450

The other float is much easier to reach and is already hanging in the right direction. There is still not enough maneuvering space for the forklift but taking it over by the workshop crane brings the float to its position at the starboard side of the center hull.

20171008_162008_45020171015_232833_450

After all the dust has been removed, the first work is putting the floats upside down for applying the Coppercoat anti-foul.


Fram appears in her full glory

October 16, 2017

Now the beams are finished (fairings still to do but on a later moment) it becomes high time to finish the paintwork on the outside of the hull.

See the updated gallery for the latest photos.

20170820_210320_45020170924_145323_450

While the boat is still lying at an angle to the ground this is also a good moment to provide the hull with 5 layers of Coppercoat. First the port half and after turning the boat on her other side the starboard half.

20170813_154229_45020170824_001553_450

And finally the time has come to break down the temporary insulation shed …

20170928_191236_450

and show Fram in her fullest glory ๐Ÿ™‚

20170930_174354_45020170930_174557_450


Insufficient attention in the class ?

October 3, 2017

First of all, thanks to the other F36 / F39 builders who have gone through the same process and published their learned lessons. I was convinced that I would not step in the same traps.

Now I know better. Pride comes before the fall.

Lessons learned, stay sharp also at the end of a long building project.

20170806_160438_450

Using the outer ends of the beams as a mold for making the beam sleeves is not very difficult, I made them with vacuum bagging, but releasing them from the beam outer end is another story. I was warned by the experience of other builders who had great difficulties with releasing the sleeves. This helps me a lot executing a well proven releasing procedure to lever off the beam bolt. So I made some wooden beams and placed them over the beam bolt nut with a big washer in between. Connection with the sleeve is with two layers ofย  (left over)ย  carbon UD. I prepared the beam outer ends with 5 layers of a mold release wax. I have used this stuff before and had not difficulties with it ……

20170809_182658_450

However, somewhere in this process or in my thinking I made a big mistake and my worst nightmare has become true. The sleeves did not want to loosen. Even with a very brute force they are not prepared to separate from the beam. Of course there is always a plan B, but damn, this feels like a loss. I ended up with making a cut in the underside of the sleeve giving space for some wedges. All four sleeves were more or less glued to the beam at the same spot, the edge between underside and outer end. Coincidence ? or has anyone a smart conclusion …

20170809_202846_450

In retrospect, the preparation with the mold release wax was not good enough. Did I forget this edge ? did I forget it five times ! (I’m not surprised at anything) or should I have used a PVA release agent in addition to the wax. Or using packaging tape in addition to the other mold release stuff which gives then two chances as the tape itself is also able to release. I don’t know. What I do know is that the approach of the four beams at the same time did not prove very clever for such a delicate work. There is no way to adjust the technique and make improvements in the meantime.

20170811_172517_450

What I do know now is that plan B is not a big deal and is a good solution for quick builders. Thus not worth a nightmare ๐Ÿ˜‰

Pffff, a huge relief.

More photo’s of this adventure are here.


%d bloggers like this: